FAQ

Basics of the Ethical Collaboration Community Agreement

The IP Transfer portion of the Ethical Collaboration Community Agreement works this way:

Any time someone helps you with your project, they transfer the rights to their contribution to you.  This ONLY occurs when they do not have any project related to yours.

For example, let’s say I work for a company doing cyber security and you are working on something related to online security.  If I help you with your project, I probably have a preexisting obligation that all my ideas are owned by my company, so I do NOT transfer my suggestion to you.

However, if you are working on a drone project and I give you a great idea, that idea is yours to do with as you please.  If you want to make it Open Source, you are free to do so.  If you want to get a patent on it, you can do that, too.

If you get a patent on an idea that I help you with, I agree to sign all of the patent documents and officially transfer the ownership of the idea to you.  The Ethical Collaboration Community Agreement puts a value on that transaction of $100, so that I will sign the paperwork and you will pay me $100.

If there are any problems with who “owns” the idea, the Agreement let’s us settle any issue with mediation or arbitration.  If we disagree, such as if I won’t sign your paperwork, you can resolve this kind of thing quickly and easily.

Open Source is a great way to share your hobbies and other contributions.  Many businesses use Open Source products and many people like to contribute to Open Source projects.

Signing the Ethical Collaboration Community Agreement or some other NDA may not directly affect you or your project, but it does protect other people in your community.  They might have a business need to protect their IP, like if they work for a company who has some product that they want to keep quiet before their launch.

You might not think there is a personal benefit from signing the Ethical Collaboration Community Agreement because you want everything to be Open Source.  But you don’t want someone hearing about your project then running out to get a patent on your latest Open Source idea, do you?  The Ethical Collaboration Community Agreement protects you – even as an Open Source advocate – from people “helping” you then turning around and doing something bad.

Part of the Ethical Collaboration Community Agreement is that ideas are transferred to the project owner on the project owner’s terms.  So if you get some help from someone else, you can be assured that you won’t have trouble as you commit your project to the public through Open Source.

Non-Disclosure Agreements are necessary because there are legal issues that occur without one.  For example, sharing your project without an NDA may cause you to lose your trade secret or patent rights.

Sadly, having a handshake agreement or “friend-D-A” does not solve the problem, either.

There is a domino effect with NDAs.  Virtually all NDAs require that something be kept secret *unless* the person makes the information public.  We don’t want someone to trigger that domino effect by inadvertently sharing their information with someone else.

You can learn more from this topic taken from the (free) Ethical Collaboration Certification training: http://ethicalcollaboration.13.84.174.210.xip.io/topic/friend-d-hurt/.

The Non-Disclosure Agreement portion of the Ethical Collaboration Agreement is a conventional, low-level NDA.

The NDA portion is designed for casual conversations that might occur over a cup of coffee, in a mastermind meeting, between colleagues in a coworking space, or in a makerspace between two craftsmen working on their projects.

The NDA ensures that everybody respects each other’s intellectual property and that sharing your project does not trigger any type of unintended consequences, such as losing patent rights.

As a community, we want the entrepreneurs to have full rights to their ideas and to make sure they do not lose their rights by accident.

The Ethical Collaboration Community Agreement has three parts:

  1. A low-level Non-Disclosure Agreement designed for casual interactions and collaboration.
  2. An intellectual property transfer agreement that ensures that when we help someone, we do so without strings.
  3. A mediation and arbitration provision that ensures disputes are handled quickly and inexpensively.

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Details of the Agreement

The IP Transfer portion of the Ethical Collaboration Community Agreement works this way:

Any time someone helps you with your project, they transfer the rights to their contribution to you.  This ONLY occurs when they do not have any project related to yours.

For example, let’s say I work for a company doing cyber security and you are working on something related to online security.  If I help you with your project, I probably have a preexisting obligation that all my ideas are owned by my company, so I do NOT transfer my suggestion to you.

However, if you are working on a drone project and I give you a great idea, that idea is yours to do with as you please.  If you want to make it Open Source, you are free to do so.  If you want to get a patent on it, you can do that, too.

If you get a patent on an idea that I help you with, I agree to sign all of the patent documents and officially transfer the ownership of the idea to you.  The Ethical Collaboration Community Agreement puts a value on that transaction of $100, so that I will sign the paperwork and you will pay me $100.

If there are any problems with who “owns” the idea, the Agreement let’s us settle any issue with mediation or arbitration.  If we disagree, such as if I won’t sign your paperwork, you can resolve this kind of thing quickly and easily.

Open Source is a great way to share your hobbies and other contributions.  Many businesses use Open Source products and many people like to contribute to Open Source projects.

Signing the Ethical Collaboration Community Agreement or some other NDA may not directly affect you or your project, but it does protect other people in your community.  They might have a business need to protect their IP, like if they work for a company who has some product that they want to keep quiet before their launch.

You might not think there is a personal benefit from signing the Ethical Collaboration Community Agreement because you want everything to be Open Source.  But you don’t want someone hearing about your project then running out to get a patent on your latest Open Source idea, do you?  The Ethical Collaboration Community Agreement protects you – even as an Open Source advocate – from people “helping” you then turning around and doing something bad.

Part of the Ethical Collaboration Community Agreement is that ideas are transferred to the project owner on the project owner’s terms.  So if you get some help from someone else, you can be assured that you won’t have trouble as you commit your project to the public through Open Source.

Non-Disclosure Agreements are necessary because there are legal issues that occur without one.  For example, sharing your project without an NDA may cause you to lose your trade secret or patent rights.

Sadly, having a handshake agreement or “friend-D-A” does not solve the problem, either.

There is a domino effect with NDAs.  Virtually all NDAs require that something be kept secret *unless* the person makes the information public.  We don’t want someone to trigger that domino effect by inadvertently sharing their information with someone else.

You can learn more from this topic taken from the (free) Ethical Collaboration Certification training: http://ethicalcollaboration.13.84.174.210.xip.io/topic/friend-d-hurt/.

The Non-Disclosure Agreement portion of the Ethical Collaboration Agreement is a conventional, low-level NDA.

The NDA portion is designed for casual conversations that might occur over a cup of coffee, in a mastermind meeting, between colleagues in a coworking space, or in a makerspace between two craftsmen working on their projects.

The NDA ensures that everybody respects each other’s intellectual property and that sharing your project does not trigger any type of unintended consequences, such as losing patent rights.

As a community, we want the entrepreneurs to have full rights to their ideas and to make sure they do not lose their rights by accident.

The Ethical Collaboration Community Agreement has three parts:

  1. A low-level Non-Disclosure Agreement designed for casual interactions and collaboration.
  2. An intellectual property transfer agreement that ensures that when we help someone, we do so without strings.
  3. A mediation and arbitration provision that ensures disputes are handled quickly and inexpensively.

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FAQ For Inventors and Entrepreneurs

The IP Transfer portion of the Ethical Collaboration Community Agreement works this way:

Any time someone helps you with your project, they transfer the rights to their contribution to you.  This ONLY occurs when they do not have any project related to yours.

For example, let’s say I work for a company doing cyber security and you are working on something related to online security.  If I help you with your project, I probably have a preexisting obligation that all my ideas are owned by my company, so I do NOT transfer my suggestion to you.

However, if you are working on a drone project and I give you a great idea, that idea is yours to do with as you please.  If you want to make it Open Source, you are free to do so.  If you want to get a patent on it, you can do that, too.

If you get a patent on an idea that I help you with, I agree to sign all of the patent documents and officially transfer the ownership of the idea to you.  The Ethical Collaboration Community Agreement puts a value on that transaction of $100, so that I will sign the paperwork and you will pay me $100.

If there are any problems with who “owns” the idea, the Agreement let’s us settle any issue with mediation or arbitration.  If we disagree, such as if I won’t sign your paperwork, you can resolve this kind of thing quickly and easily.

Open Source is a great way to share your hobbies and other contributions.  Many businesses use Open Source products and many people like to contribute to Open Source projects.

Signing the Ethical Collaboration Community Agreement or some other NDA may not directly affect you or your project, but it does protect other people in your community.  They might have a business need to protect their IP, like if they work for a company who has some product that they want to keep quiet before their launch.

You might not think there is a personal benefit from signing the Ethical Collaboration Community Agreement because you want everything to be Open Source.  But you don’t want someone hearing about your project then running out to get a patent on your latest Open Source idea, do you?  The Ethical Collaboration Community Agreement protects you – even as an Open Source advocate – from people “helping” you then turning around and doing something bad.

Part of the Ethical Collaboration Community Agreement is that ideas are transferred to the project owner on the project owner’s terms.  So if you get some help from someone else, you can be assured that you won’t have trouble as you commit your project to the public through Open Source.

Non-Disclosure Agreements are necessary because there are legal issues that occur without one.  For example, sharing your project without an NDA may cause you to lose your trade secret or patent rights.

Sadly, having a handshake agreement or “friend-D-A” does not solve the problem, either.

There is a domino effect with NDAs.  Virtually all NDAs require that something be kept secret *unless* the person makes the information public.  We don’t want someone to trigger that domino effect by inadvertently sharing their information with someone else.

You can learn more from this topic taken from the (free) Ethical Collaboration Certification training: http://ethicalcollaboration.13.84.174.210.xip.io/topic/friend-d-hurt/.

The Non-Disclosure Agreement portion of the Ethical Collaboration Agreement is a conventional, low-level NDA.

The NDA portion is designed for casual conversations that might occur over a cup of coffee, in a mastermind meeting, between colleagues in a coworking space, or in a makerspace between two craftsmen working on their projects.

The NDA ensures that everybody respects each other’s intellectual property and that sharing your project does not trigger any type of unintended consequences, such as losing patent rights.

As a community, we want the entrepreneurs to have full rights to their ideas and to make sure they do not lose their rights by accident.

The Ethical Collaboration Community Agreement has three parts:

  1. A low-level Non-Disclosure Agreement designed for casual interactions and collaboration.
  2. An intellectual property transfer agreement that ensures that when we help someone, we do so without strings.
  3. A mediation and arbitration provision that ensures disputes are handled quickly and inexpensively.

Load More

FAQ For Advisors and Mentors

The IP Transfer portion of the Ethical Collaboration Community Agreement works this way:

Any time someone helps you with your project, they transfer the rights to their contribution to you.  This ONLY occurs when they do not have any project related to yours.

For example, let’s say I work for a company doing cyber security and you are working on something related to online security.  If I help you with your project, I probably have a preexisting obligation that all my ideas are owned by my company, so I do NOT transfer my suggestion to you.

However, if you are working on a drone project and I give you a great idea, that idea is yours to do with as you please.  If you want to make it Open Source, you are free to do so.  If you want to get a patent on it, you can do that, too.

If you get a patent on an idea that I help you with, I agree to sign all of the patent documents and officially transfer the ownership of the idea to you.  The Ethical Collaboration Community Agreement puts a value on that transaction of $100, so that I will sign the paperwork and you will pay me $100.

If there are any problems with who “owns” the idea, the Agreement let’s us settle any issue with mediation or arbitration.  If we disagree, such as if I won’t sign your paperwork, you can resolve this kind of thing quickly and easily.

Open Source is a great way to share your hobbies and other contributions.  Many businesses use Open Source products and many people like to contribute to Open Source projects.

Signing the Ethical Collaboration Community Agreement or some other NDA may not directly affect you or your project, but it does protect other people in your community.  They might have a business need to protect their IP, like if they work for a company who has some product that they want to keep quiet before their launch.

You might not think there is a personal benefit from signing the Ethical Collaboration Community Agreement because you want everything to be Open Source.  But you don’t want someone hearing about your project then running out to get a patent on your latest Open Source idea, do you?  The Ethical Collaboration Community Agreement protects you – even as an Open Source advocate – from people “helping” you then turning around and doing something bad.

Part of the Ethical Collaboration Community Agreement is that ideas are transferred to the project owner on the project owner’s terms.  So if you get some help from someone else, you can be assured that you won’t have trouble as you commit your project to the public through Open Source.

Non-Disclosure Agreements are necessary because there are legal issues that occur without one.  For example, sharing your project without an NDA may cause you to lose your trade secret or patent rights.

Sadly, having a handshake agreement or “friend-D-A” does not solve the problem, either.

There is a domino effect with NDAs.  Virtually all NDAs require that something be kept secret *unless* the person makes the information public.  We don’t want someone to trigger that domino effect by inadvertently sharing their information with someone else.

You can learn more from this topic taken from the (free) Ethical Collaboration Certification training: http://ethicalcollaboration.13.84.174.210.xip.io/topic/friend-d-hurt/.

The Non-Disclosure Agreement portion of the Ethical Collaboration Agreement is a conventional, low-level NDA.

The NDA portion is designed for casual conversations that might occur over a cup of coffee, in a mastermind meeting, between colleagues in a coworking space, or in a makerspace between two craftsmen working on their projects.

The NDA ensures that everybody respects each other’s intellectual property and that sharing your project does not trigger any type of unintended consequences, such as losing patent rights.

As a community, we want the entrepreneurs to have full rights to their ideas and to make sure they do not lose their rights by accident.

The Ethical Collaboration Community Agreement has three parts:

  1. A low-level Non-Disclosure Agreement designed for casual interactions and collaboration.
  2. An intellectual property transfer agreement that ensures that when we help someone, we do so without strings.
  3. A mediation and arbitration provision that ensures disputes are handled quickly and inexpensively.

Load More

FAQ For Service Providers

The IP Transfer portion of the Ethical Collaboration Community Agreement works this way:

Any time someone helps you with your project, they transfer the rights to their contribution to you.  This ONLY occurs when they do not have any project related to yours.

For example, let’s say I work for a company doing cyber security and you are working on something related to online security.  If I help you with your project, I probably have a preexisting obligation that all my ideas are owned by my company, so I do NOT transfer my suggestion to you.

However, if you are working on a drone project and I give you a great idea, that idea is yours to do with as you please.  If you want to make it Open Source, you are free to do so.  If you want to get a patent on it, you can do that, too.

If you get a patent on an idea that I help you with, I agree to sign all of the patent documents and officially transfer the ownership of the idea to you.  The Ethical Collaboration Community Agreement puts a value on that transaction of $100, so that I will sign the paperwork and you will pay me $100.

If there are any problems with who “owns” the idea, the Agreement let’s us settle any issue with mediation or arbitration.  If we disagree, such as if I won’t sign your paperwork, you can resolve this kind of thing quickly and easily.

Open Source is a great way to share your hobbies and other contributions.  Many businesses use Open Source products and many people like to contribute to Open Source projects.

Signing the Ethical Collaboration Community Agreement or some other NDA may not directly affect you or your project, but it does protect other people in your community.  They might have a business need to protect their IP, like if they work for a company who has some product that they want to keep quiet before their launch.

You might not think there is a personal benefit from signing the Ethical Collaboration Community Agreement because you want everything to be Open Source.  But you don’t want someone hearing about your project then running out to get a patent on your latest Open Source idea, do you?  The Ethical Collaboration Community Agreement protects you – even as an Open Source advocate – from people “helping” you then turning around and doing something bad.

Part of the Ethical Collaboration Community Agreement is that ideas are transferred to the project owner on the project owner’s terms.  So if you get some help from someone else, you can be assured that you won’t have trouble as you commit your project to the public through Open Source.

Non-Disclosure Agreements are necessary because there are legal issues that occur without one.  For example, sharing your project without an NDA may cause you to lose your trade secret or patent rights.

Sadly, having a handshake agreement or “friend-D-A” does not solve the problem, either.

There is a domino effect with NDAs.  Virtually all NDAs require that something be kept secret *unless* the person makes the information public.  We don’t want someone to trigger that domino effect by inadvertently sharing their information with someone else.

You can learn more from this topic taken from the (free) Ethical Collaboration Certification training: http://ethicalcollaboration.13.84.174.210.xip.io/topic/friend-d-hurt/.

The Non-Disclosure Agreement portion of the Ethical Collaboration Agreement is a conventional, low-level NDA.

The NDA portion is designed for casual conversations that might occur over a cup of coffee, in a mastermind meeting, between colleagues in a coworking space, or in a makerspace between two craftsmen working on their projects.

The NDA ensures that everybody respects each other’s intellectual property and that sharing your project does not trigger any type of unintended consequences, such as losing patent rights.

As a community, we want the entrepreneurs to have full rights to their ideas and to make sure they do not lose their rights by accident.

The Ethical Collaboration Community Agreement has three parts:

  1. A low-level Non-Disclosure Agreement designed for casual interactions and collaboration.
  2. An intellectual property transfer agreement that ensures that when we help someone, we do so without strings.
  3. A mediation and arbitration provision that ensures disputes are handled quickly and inexpensively.

Load More

FAQ For Group Leaders

The IP Transfer portion of the Ethical Collaboration Community Agreement works this way:

Any time someone helps you with your project, they transfer the rights to their contribution to you.  This ONLY occurs when they do not have any project related to yours.

For example, let’s say I work for a company doing cyber security and you are working on something related to online security.  If I help you with your project, I probably have a preexisting obligation that all my ideas are owned by my company, so I do NOT transfer my suggestion to you.

However, if you are working on a drone project and I give you a great idea, that idea is yours to do with as you please.  If you want to make it Open Source, you are free to do so.  If you want to get a patent on it, you can do that, too.

If you get a patent on an idea that I help you with, I agree to sign all of the patent documents and officially transfer the ownership of the idea to you.  The Ethical Collaboration Community Agreement puts a value on that transaction of $100, so that I will sign the paperwork and you will pay me $100.

If there are any problems with who “owns” the idea, the Agreement let’s us settle any issue with mediation or arbitration.  If we disagree, such as if I won’t sign your paperwork, you can resolve this kind of thing quickly and easily.

Open Source is a great way to share your hobbies and other contributions.  Many businesses use Open Source products and many people like to contribute to Open Source projects.

Signing the Ethical Collaboration Community Agreement or some other NDA may not directly affect you or your project, but it does protect other people in your community.  They might have a business need to protect their IP, like if they work for a company who has some product that they want to keep quiet before their launch.

You might not think there is a personal benefit from signing the Ethical Collaboration Community Agreement because you want everything to be Open Source.  But you don’t want someone hearing about your project then running out to get a patent on your latest Open Source idea, do you?  The Ethical Collaboration Community Agreement protects you – even as an Open Source advocate – from people “helping” you then turning around and doing something bad.

Part of the Ethical Collaboration Community Agreement is that ideas are transferred to the project owner on the project owner’s terms.  So if you get some help from someone else, you can be assured that you won’t have trouble as you commit your project to the public through Open Source.

Non-Disclosure Agreements are necessary because there are legal issues that occur without one.  For example, sharing your project without an NDA may cause you to lose your trade secret or patent rights.

Sadly, having a handshake agreement or “friend-D-A” does not solve the problem, either.

There is a domino effect with NDAs.  Virtually all NDAs require that something be kept secret *unless* the person makes the information public.  We don’t want someone to trigger that domino effect by inadvertently sharing their information with someone else.

You can learn more from this topic taken from the (free) Ethical Collaboration Certification training: http://ethicalcollaboration.13.84.174.210.xip.io/topic/friend-d-hurt/.

The Non-Disclosure Agreement portion of the Ethical Collaboration Agreement is a conventional, low-level NDA.

The NDA portion is designed for casual conversations that might occur over a cup of coffee, in a mastermind meeting, between colleagues in a coworking space, or in a makerspace between two craftsmen working on their projects.

The NDA ensures that everybody respects each other’s intellectual property and that sharing your project does not trigger any type of unintended consequences, such as losing patent rights.

As a community, we want the entrepreneurs to have full rights to their ideas and to make sure they do not lose their rights by accident.

The Ethical Collaboration Community Agreement has three parts:

  1. A low-level Non-Disclosure Agreement designed for casual interactions and collaboration.
  2. An intellectual property transfer agreement that ensures that when we help someone, we do so without strings.
  3. A mediation and arbitration provision that ensures disputes are handled quickly and inexpensively.

Load More